hello, My name is Eszter Domjan. I’m a New York City-based psychotherapist focused on the body-mind connection.

How I work

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If you feel stuck or overwhelmed by the challenges in your life – perhaps a traumatic experience in your past, a creative block, maybe a new baby at home or a challenging life-transition – I am here to help. I will work with you as you discover your own inner resources, so you can find a way forward, heal and integrate past experiences, become more resilient, feel more comfortable in your skin and at home in the world. You might find that the process leads to a joyful new openness.

I offer somatic psychotherapy sessions, which means that I work with both the body and the mind. There are fascinating discoveries from the field of neuroscience and psychobiology that make us understand so much more about our nervous systems, and about what our bodies and minds need in order to heal and thrive. This is invaluable in understanding how to make therapeutic interventions truly effective and helpful. To read more about the therapeutic tools that I use click here.

My fascination with working with the body is rooted in my background in dance and yoga. Also, my years of experience as a doula/labor-support taught me how to gently support transitional processes that ask us to go to the edges of our capabilities both physically and emotionally. All those experiences have led me to deeply believe and trust the inner wisdom of the body-mind.

I have a special place in my heart for work with women who are on their path to motherhood. If you struggle with the experience of being a new mom, being pregnant, having challenges in getting pregnant, or dealing with a loss, I would love to support you. Click here to read more about my services in maternal mental health.

Who I am

I was born and raised in Budapest, Hungary. I was initially drawn to the study of psychology as a way to gain insight into human behavior. I earned a master’s degree in Developmental and Cognitive Psychology from ELTE University in Budapest. I also studied contemporary dance and worked professionally as a dancer and choreographer. My involvement in these two fields led naturally to a focus on the interdependence of mind and body.

As an adult I have sought to continually expand my context, living in several countries and working with diverse communities in many capacities.  My experience supporting people with a huge range of needs and expectations has fostered my innate adaptability and empathic tendencies. I have mastered English, Spanish, and Turkish, and have learned to appreciate, and be passionate about people from different cultural, religious, and socio-economic backgrounds.

I moved to New York in 2011 and this is when I realized that psychotherapy can be done from a body-centered approach. All my different interests fell into place as I came to understand that I have always been drawn to work with the body-mind, and in New York I had access to excellent teachers and the materials to dive further into my studies of a body-mind perspective on psychotherapy. I went back to school to get another master’s degree – this time in Mental Health Counseling – in order to get licensed in New York.

While working on my license, I also worked for three years as a birth doula/labour support. I became fascinated by birth and the special body-mind connection that happens during labor. I worked with women and new families, supporting them in this transitional period of their lives. I fell in love with the beauty and intensity of being part of birth and supporting women. I miss going to births, but my work as a therapist has much more in common with my doula work than I would have thought: witnessing and supporting vulnerability and courage; the stretching of the limits; jaw dropping moments of transformation, and a lot of endurance – on everybody’s part.

I continue to study, as my enthusiasm for learning more and more about the human body, mind, and soul is endless; I know I will be always expanding my experiential and theoretical toolbox. I find my work as a therapist deeply fulfilling, since what I’m interested most in my own life and the lives of the people who come see me is how to become more fully present to our human experience.